Where are the deaths?

Today I thought I would venture over to Stats Canada’s sight to see what has been reported since I have heard nothing really from the usual suspects.
I was surprised in that it appears the folks over at Stats Canada have done some proper verification of the data and have come up with some pretty surprising numbers. Statistics Canada has painted a picture of the total death toll during the first year of the pandemic.

In a published report, StatsCan found 18,511 more Canadians died than demographers expected from the start of the pandemic in March 2020 to early March 2021.
That worked out to excess mortality rate of 6.7 percent for the first year of the pandemic nationwide. Now keep in mind, and they mention that the excess deaths are not simply due to more people dying from COVID-19, and after accounting for factors such as aging. “…Beyond deaths attributed to the disease itself, the pandemic could also have indirect consequences that increase or decrease the number of deaths as a result of various factors, including delayed medical procedures, increased substance use, or declines in deaths attributable to other causes, such as influenza…” Statistics Canada said in the report.

I am sensing they are performing the same sort of qualifying of data as many of us, factor in comorbidities, deaths “from” COVID vs Deaths “with”. This would quickly put these numbers at a very conservative 9000 or a little more.
Honestly, finding holes in those early estimates is like shooting fish in a bucket. I wonder if I and the many others who were all over Stats Canada had no option but to release truthful numbers. I know I had most of their data downloaded before they removed it, so I was ready to verify their numbers to see if they “restated” some of the numbers for 2019 and early 2020 to show some spike and net new deaths.

A while ago, I found out that Ontario keeps incredibly accurate records dating back to 1949, with each record supported by an actual official document or death certificate. Not all deaths in Ontario have official papers in the form of a death certificate; however, in analyzing the data against a paid subscription data service’s records, there is a direct correlation to these two datasets. as seen in figure
Even though some deaths will not be reported, using official death certificates is a reliable indicator of an overall provincial death rate.
In the charts included, the numbers do not indicate any spike in deaths; there is a drop in overall deaths due to people’s inactivity. However, what is absent in these numbers are the predicted vast numbers.

Another thing to consider in all this number crunching and determining a valid number is the zero deaths recorded due to the flu. This in itself is factually impossible, since according to over 20 years of data that I also have and have seen, we were on course for a terrible flu season in 2020. , are the flu deaths being recorded as COVID to skew the numbers? What is one left to assume? Where are the numbers that we were told we would see? Any COVID-related death would be recorded with an official death certificate as standard protocol. If the government has removed data, is not reporting flu-related deaths, what is one left to assume?

So could math be prevailing, and fully qualified numbers are being reported instead of inflated speculative numbers?

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